Tumaini Nursery School

With Art in Tanzania supporting over 100 community schools and education centres, there are many different location opportunities for teaching projects for volunteers/interns. Academic centres benefit from the work of interns and volunteers  as innovative methods of teaching are introduced helping not only the students but the staff also.

Earlier this week I was given the opportunity to visit the local pre-school in Madale IMG_2735 (1)
Village; Tumaini Nursery School. Although there is no current project at this particular time, I was able to visit to experience a typical lesson and document the work of previous volunteers.

At this school, ages range from two to six and here are three separate classes for different age groups. The aim of Tumaini nursery is to prepare the young students before their transition to primary school; ensuring that they are at the appropriate academic level. Not only have Art in Tanzania volunteers been involved in teaching and education projects at Tumaini, but also projects involving construction to help enhance the quality of the nursery school. The renovation of classrooms to improve the teaching environment as well as the construction of basic facilities such as toilets (as pictured below) are some examples projects that have taken place in previous years.

On my particular visit to the school, the children were taking mathematics exams to monitor their progress so far and test whether they are ready to move on to the next level. For the oldest age group (5-6 yrs old) the exam consisted of addition and subtraction of numbers and different ways of writing these sums. However, for the IMG_2733younger years (2-3 yrs old) they will be called to the teacher individually or in small groups and asked questions about what they have been learning. This acts as a more relaxed approach for the younger ones. Once the exam is over, after about an hour, it is break time for the students and they are able to run outside and play. There is a large open space just in front of the classrooms where the children are able to run about safely and they are provided with a swing set that is indeed very popular! Like all nursery school children, they enjoy playing different games and this particular break time they formed a circle by holding hands and began to sing what sounded like a traditional nursery rhyme or song.

 

With the help and support of our volunteers, schools such as Tumaini Nursery School and local organisations are able to benefit from the various projects run by Art in Tanzania! To find out more about how to get involved or to get extra info about the various projects, don’t hesitate to visit our website!

Asante sana,

Lily 

Teaching at the Glory of Africa Orphanage

Hi!

I’m Lily and am a Social Media and Marketing intern at Art in Tanzania!

I accompanied one of my fellow interns, Michiel – a volunteer from Holland, to the Glory of Africa Orphanage located about 30 minutes from the Dar es Salaam compound. As part of his project, Michiel is teaching English to children of various ages ranging from 4 to 14 years old and I was able to go along to document what happens on a typical day.

First things first, let me give you a bit of an insight into what the Glory of Africa Orphanage is all about. Founded in 2012, Glory of Africa currently houses 8 children with many more in the neighbourhood coming every day for education and food which is made available through donations. Art in Tanzania’s interns and volunteers have been working with Glory of Africa since 2013 by creating different projects as a means of support. ‘The Glory Water Pipeline’ is an example of a clean water and sanitation project that was created in 2013 whereby volunteers raised money and donated a water tank to the orphanage. There is a classroom within the compound where you can find a blackboard, chalk, rows of desks and a cupboard filled with pencils and paper. All this is to ensure that the children have equipment for the lessons that take place and to provide a classroom environment.

Michiel usually visits the orphanage in the afternoon around 4pm after the children have finished their daily school routines, therefore lessons are a sort of after school activity for the children typically lasting between one and two hours. In previous weeks, the children have been learning the basics of English with one particular lesson focusing on various animals and the translation of these animals from Kiswahili to English. By the end of the lesson the children were able to successfully communicate in English what their favourite animal is and why! I went along with Michiel on his 4th visit to the orphanage. The lesson started off with a recap of the previous days teachings, which consisted of verbs, and then moved on to focus on different grammatical terms. This lesson had particular focus on nouns and identifying the nouns within in a sentence. Different sentences were written in English on the blackboard and the children were asked to come up to the front and underline the noun in each sentence, all correctly identifying the noun. From starting with simple English words to teaching various grammatical terms, their knowledge and understanding of English is coming along swimmingly as Michiel moves on to teaching more advanced topics aiming to introduce Human Rights perhaps to some of the older children.

IMG_2591With everything learned and the lesson over, it was time for some games! Football seems to be a loved sport in Tanzania, and the orphanage was no different…

Two footballs were given to the children and, joined my Michiel, they rushed out the door to have a kick about outside.The orphanage has a big open space where the children can play and run about between and after lessons. Everyone got involved in the game and the children looked extremely happy and full of energy; it was a great chance for them to get out and be active after learning. We ended up staying for around an hour and a half after the lesson playing and talking to the children which was a great way to get to know more about them outside of the classroom!

Taking the opportunity to volunteer by teaching English is a fantastic opportunity and what better way than to volunteer with Art in Tanzania and support local organisations such as the Glory of Africa Orphanage. With their desire to learn, teaching and getting to know these children seems so rewarding; being able to play games with them is a bonus too!

If you would like to take part in a project like this or for other volunteering opportunities, visit our website for more details!

 

Teaching in Tanzania

I am Katie, a Media and Journalism intern at Art In Tanzania. As part of my project, I am able to travel alongside my fellow interns to their projects and document what happens there.
Today we visited Mtakuja Secondary School, an international school that teaches students from 13 to 20 years old. The school provides the students education on Maths, Sciences, Geography and Kiswahili classes, and has an arts department that includes a variety of subjects, such as History, English and Sport. The school also has a small library and medical area and teachers told me that they are hoping to gain funding for a sports court someday in order to expand the variety of sports available for the students to practice.

 

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We arrived at the school during the students break and I was able to speak to a few of the students about the school and what they like about it. Teddy, aged 14, told me that she enjoys going to school to study maths and sciences, especially as she dreams of being an engineer when she is older. For students such as Teddy, there is a physics lab, and other specific departments within the school where they can study individual subjects. Two girls I spoke to at break time told me that they spend most of their time in one department as they only study business at the school. Interns have the opportunity to choose a department to teach in if they would like to. To start the process of teaching at the secondary school, interns go and discuss important details with the teachers such as the syllabuses that the students are learning and the school timetable. Interns have time to plan lessons and to collaborate between projects in order to produce a fun and interesting lesson for the students.

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I joined a class where Nathaniel, Daverine and Lara were teaching Human Rights. Nathanial asked the students to name what they thought were their basic human rights and write them on the board. The students were engaged and discussed why basic human rights are important and what rights belong to individual countries, for example: the right to carry a gun is exclusive to the United states of America. Nathaniel spoke of the origins of the 30 human rights created by the United Nations, and how religion and morality played a role in human behavior and basic rights before the law was passed. After the lesson, Lara spoke of how important it is for young students to be educated on their rights and other important issues. As interns, teaching is a good way to connect with the local people and understand more about what life is like as a young person in Tanzania.

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At the accommodation, there are facilities to teach younger children that go to school in the village. This takes place in the evenings so it is easier to participate in teaching this way if your project requires you to be elsewhere during the daytime, or if you prefer a more casual environment. The interns can play with the children and teach them English and maths in a comfortable environment which often proves most rewarding. From spending time teaching the younger children, I found I could learn as much from them as they could from me, and we ended up writing things in English and Kiswahili and teaching each-other the correct pronunciation. Hanging out with the village kids is a lot of fun, especially as they loooooove to dance (and to laugh at my terrible moves) and it is wonderful to see their language skills developing, especially if you have spent a lot of time with the same children. Nathanial also runs a debate group with adult students who wish to improve their English skills. He allocates time for practice with numbers and words which the adults are struggling with. This is also a fantastic opportunity to find out the opinions of the adults and learn from them.

 
Overall, I think that taking the opportunity to teach while doing an internship with Art In Tanzania is a fantastic thing to do and will really increase your involvement in local life here. The experiences I have from meeting students and teaching here are ones that I will never forget, and I have learned a great deal from the young people in this country.

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Local Public School in Tanzania (Dar es Salaam)

Hi!

This is Hikaru. I am an internship student of Art in Tanzania.

Last week, I was given opportunities to visit local public schools. “There are normally about 900 students and 40-50 teachers in a school during academic semesters”, says a president of one of the schools. In Tanzania, there are two major kinds of academic curriculum; national academic curriculum and European academic curriculum. Most public schools follow the national one which provides exams before every medium and long vacations. The time I went the schools was very end of an exam season before long summer vacations, so there were not much students there, compared to regular days. That means that the holiday classes, which are charged by intern/ volunteer students, are coming soon at Art in Tanzania! Team leaders are busy for organizing now. Holiday times we arrange holiday classes for those behind the studies together with the schools. Holiday classes are also important for those students coming from poor families who cannot afford to have any family holiday programs.

 

We are always welcome who are interested into teaching, supporting, or communicating with local kids! Details are available at web site of Art in Tanzania; http://www.artintanzania.org/

 

During the visitation, I was reminded of memories of my school life when I was their age. The kids at the schools are very well behaved and energetic. Even though I did not understand what they were saying, I understood how they hang out, play, or chat each other are just same as other schools I saw in other nations, Japan, USA, or France. However that, Tanzanian school system is different from others.

 

Here in Tanzania, if they cannot pass exams, they have to repeat one more academic period for taking exams to move up to next classes. At the schools, some are relaxed about their exams and enjoyed to play around with peers. Some look a bit stressed from studying for coming exams especially at secondary schools. I was told that some people are given up their education after they failed because they are embarrassed to remain same class with younger peers.

 

Tanzanian government spends more efforts for the education system. The number of schools, students, and teachers, and the quality of them are being improved constantly.

 

Thank Twiga Primary and Secondary School, Taguja Primary and Secondary School, Poani Primary School, and Kondo Secondary School for giving me good opportunities.

YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWrFy1zaG8c&feature=youtu.be

Donations to An-Nabawiya Nursery School

school2 SebastienBeunA small nursery in the village of Fuoni, pronounced An – na – Ba – wee –yah, built in 2012 by Ms Asia Issa Jecha and Mr Hassan Mwinyi kombo as part of a women’s project.

The school is run by 6 local teachers who devote their time from 07:30 in the morning to 12:00pm, five days a week, in order to help educate the young local children. The school initially had 93 students and now have at least 100 local children who attend the nursery for free. The nursery building is also used from 19:00 to 20:00 for private tuition classes; these are held by different teachers.

teaching3-SebastienBeunThe children learn English, Maths, Science, Swahili, Arabic, Art and Religious Studies. Art in Tanzania have been involved with the nursery since 2014 and have provided a total number of 10 volunteers who have helped teach the children and also assisted the local teachers, by, for example, providing them with one to one English lessons.

The first day we visited the nursery was to deliver four benches that were kindly donated by a former Swedish volunteer; altogether there are four classrooms, however, all four of the benches were placed in one classroom. The aim is to fill all four classrooms with these little benches so that all of the children can benefit and enjoy learning in a comfortable environment. All the children wanted to sit on them and were extremely excited and happy with the generous donation.

When we went to visit the nursery again, we spoke to the head teacher, Mrs Latifa Mahfoudh, a stunning and pleasant woman who you could see loved working with the children and had always had a passion for teaching; we sat down and had a long chat at about the nursery and what her ambitions were for the nursery and its students.

Latifa pointed out some of the improvements to the actual building that needed to be carried out; a new roof was needed as the current one leaked, new windows were needed as well as a more stable and safer wall/fence around the parameters of the school with a gate, in order to keep the children safe and protected. Two of the classrooms were not plastered so it was impossible to provide a more pleasant environment for the children to learn in, as you can see from the pictures, the classrooms were dark and unpleasant, even with the sun blazing outside. The nursery also needed to build new toilets for the little boys and girls to use.

As well as the children’s facilities, Latifa showed us her own office, which really does need some attention, it would help her to have a proper carpet that covered all of the floor, new stable chairs and shelves so that when volunteers or guests come, they too can use the office and have a pleasant and clean workspace to work in, without feeling your chair is going to giveaway any second! Latifa would also like to go on computer courses and get computer for her office to make her work easier.

Upon our return, three volunteers, Louise Proctor, Claire Manning and Elizabeth Drey flew out to Zanzibar from Ireland and brought with them a very generous donation of over £4000 for the nursery; with their help and local workers, building work has now commenced, with a new roof and plastering. The work on the wall/fence will be started next, and then the new windows will be fitted. The donations will also help to build new toilets for the little boys and girls. A further £3296 has been donated by Whitney Harris-Linton from Michigan (£77 put towards the roof), Melissa Wolsley from Findlay, Australia (donated £99 for a black board to be fitted in the classroom) £2600 and £520 have also been donated from more kind donators. The money given will be used to finish renovating the school and any money left over will be used on a new project in Madale, Dar-Es-Salam, subject to the donors consent.

kiswahili sebastienIf you would like to volunteer at the nursery or donate; your time, skills, money, toys, stationary or school equipment, do contact Edward Busungu at Art in Tanzania and get involved, it certainly is a fantastic project and the children and staff are simply delightful to be around.

If you do wish to teach at the school, we would recommend spending more than two weeks, as this will enable you to build a much better rapport with the children and staff, allowing them to put into practice what you teach and you will be able to witness the difference that your presence can make in their lives and futures.

 

Al – Quwiyyi Islamic School

A private Islamic school in the village of Fuoni, named after the founder’s, Mr Hakeem Abdullah, families tribe name in Mafia, pronounced Al Qu-wee.

The school was opened on Monday 13th January 2014 after four months of preparations. The school has 24 classes, providing nursery to secondary education to approximately 600 local students.

Art in Tanzania has been working with Al – Quwiyyi since 2015 sending volunteers to teach the children Maths, English and Science or to simply assist teachers in a range of subjects and look after the children in the classroom.

School days are Monday to Friday 07:00 to 13:00 – lunch is at 13:00. From 14:00 to 22:30 the school operates Madrassa classes for approximately 250 students. Any volunteers, who can deliver or assist in teaching Arabic, Quran, Tajweed and Fiqh will be most welcomed. The school would ideally like volunteers to stay longer than two weeks to teach, to enable the volunteers to build a great rapport with the children and staff.

If volunteers are here for a short stay or did not want to teach, they can choose to assist with cooking lunch or assist in the school’s stationary and snack shop

The founder of the school, Mr Abdullah, has an ambitious plan to build a boarding school with a Masjid, female and male hostel plus accommodation for workers in the near future, he is currently liaising with officials for a suitable plot of land. Support with this project would be welcomed from international organisations to help make his vision a reality. You can contact the school directly at alquwiyyi@hotmail.com.

If you would like to volunteer at the nursery or donate; your time, skills, money, toys, stationary or school equipment, do contact Edward Busungu at Art in Tanzania and get involved, this is a fantastic school with friendly students with great ambitions and dreams you can be a part of.

Please note that this is an Islamic school so if you do wish to volunteer be mindful of the way you dress, wearing modest clothing, by way of covering your arms, legs and your hair, would be appreciated by all the staff.

Uzi Island needs environmental interns and volunteers

Road to Uzi

Road to Uzi

Uzi is a small island in the south of Zanzibar’s main island, Unguja. The road to Uzi is called Nyeker road; manmade using rocks and stones with at least four types of mangroves on either side. The road to Uzi resembles the partition of the River Nile in the story of Moses; simply mesmerising. The road has been built slowly over 50 years. It started off as a small lane for walking; this was then made wider for the use of bicycles, then for cows and finally it was made even wider for the use of motor vehicles.

The drive to Uzi Island is very beautiful, but very bumpy, if you suffer from motion sickness, be sure to sit at the front of the vehicle or make yourself as comfortable as possible.

Our informative and helpful guide, Isshaka, met us at a resting point, made with the help of volunteers for when the tide comes in. The water can rise up to two metres when there is a full moon. When the tide is high you can goDSC03795 fishing. The land in Zanzibar is so fertile we were able to plant four mangrove seeds each, Twenty (Edward) steps from the resting point, on the right, which fulfilled a personal ambition to plant trees that will definitely grow.

The town to Uzi and has been there for around 10 years along with three wells on the Island that provide drinking water. A Dala Dala, number 334, from Uzi to Stone town takes around one hour.

Uzi baskets made by women's group

Uzi baskets made by women’s group

The main sources of income for the Island are from fishing, farming and carpenter work. There are also woman groups on the island and the woman craft their own fruit baskets that Art in Tanzania export to Finland and also sell on EBay for around 25 Dollars.

Within the mangroves, women from the villages have placed plastic bottles across the water in order to collect two types of seaweed, they use plastic boats to collect these when the tide is high; 100 of these plastic boats were donated by a friend of Isshaka. The seaweed is then made into soaps and sold in order to provide income to the villagers.

helloIsshaka went to school in Uzi then to Ston etown to study further. Isshaka is very passionate about wanting to make a difference and help people live a better life in Uzi. Isshaka does 2 radio broadcasts throughout the week; one where he brings awareness of environmental issues on Uzi Island and what others can do to help, and another broadcast called Sunset Zanzibar, where he talks about tourism and the importance to the island and how tourism can help the island develop.

Uzi grows many fruits such as Mangoes, Oranges, Guava, Yams and Cassava. Alrge Baobab trees also grow in Uzi; the villages used to cut these down, however Isshaka has been campaigning to keep these trees in order to house bee boxes that provide honey to the locals; honey season is September to October. The Baobab fruit when mixed with water and sugar is a good source of Vitamin C.

Biogas from biowaste

Biogas from biowaste

The Island really needs creative interns and volunteers passionate about the environment and sustainable development. Also people that can help the women create innovative arts and crafts in order to sell and help provide an income for many households on Uzi Island.

For volunteering at Uzi  you can contact  Art in Tanzania info (at) artintanzania.org