Tumaini Nursery School

With Art in Tanzania supporting over 100 community schools and education centres, there are many different location opportunities for teaching projects for volunteers/interns. Academic centres benefit from the work of interns and volunteers  as innovative methods of teaching are introduced helping not only the students but the staff also.

Earlier this week I was given the opportunity to visit the local pre-school in Madale IMG_2735 (1)
Village; Tumaini Nursery School. Although there is no current project at this particular time, I was able to visit to experience a typical lesson and document the work of previous volunteers.

At this school, ages range from two to six and here are three separate classes for different age groups. The aim of Tumaini nursery is to prepare the young students before their transition to primary school; ensuring that they are at the appropriate academic level. Not only have Art in Tanzania volunteers been involved in teaching and education projects at Tumaini, but also projects involving construction to help enhance the quality of the nursery school. The renovation of classrooms to improve the teaching environment as well as the construction of basic facilities such as toilets (as pictured below) are some examples projects that have taken place in previous years.

On my particular visit to the school, the children were taking mathematics exams to monitor their progress so far and test whether they are ready to move on to the next level. For the oldest age group (5-6 yrs old) the exam consisted of addition and subtraction of numbers and different ways of writing these sums. However, for the IMG_2733younger years (2-3 yrs old) they will be called to the teacher individually or in small groups and asked questions about what they have been learning. This acts as a more relaxed approach for the younger ones. Once the exam is over, after about an hour, it is break time for the students and they are able to run outside and play. There is a large open space just in front of the classrooms where the children are able to run about safely and they are provided with a swing set that is indeed very popular! Like all nursery school children, they enjoy playing different games and this particular break time they formed a circle by holding hands and began to sing what sounded like a traditional nursery rhyme or song.

 

With the help and support of our volunteers, schools such as Tumaini Nursery School and local organisations are able to benefit from the various projects run by Art in Tanzania! To find out more about how to get involved or to get extra info about the various projects, don’t hesitate to visit our website!

Asante sana,

Lily 

Teaching at the Glory of Africa Orphanage

Hi!

I’m Lily and am a Social Media and Marketing intern at Art in Tanzania!

I accompanied one of my fellow interns, Michiel – a volunteer from Holland, to the Glory of Africa Orphanage located about 30 minutes from the Dar es Salaam compound. As part of his project, Michiel is teaching English to children of various ages ranging from 4 to 14 years old and I was able to go along to document what happens on a typical day.

First things first, let me give you a bit of an insight into what the Glory of Africa Orphanage is all about. Founded in 2012, Glory of Africa currently houses 8 children with many more in the neighbourhood coming every day for education and food which is made available through donations. Art in Tanzania’s interns and volunteers have been working with Glory of Africa since 2013 by creating different projects as a means of support. ‘The Glory Water Pipeline’ is an example of a clean water and sanitation project that was created in 2013 whereby volunteers raised money and donated a water tank to the orphanage. There is a classroom within the compound where you can find a blackboard, chalk, rows of desks and a cupboard filled with pencils and paper. All this is to ensure that the children have equipment for the lessons that take place and to provide a classroom environment.

Michiel usually visits the orphanage in the afternoon around 4pm after the children have finished their daily school routines, therefore lessons are a sort of after school activity for the children typically lasting between one and two hours. In previous weeks, the children have been learning the basics of English with one particular lesson focusing on various animals and the translation of these animals from Kiswahili to English. By the end of the lesson the children were able to successfully communicate in English what their favourite animal is and why! I went along with Michiel on his 4th visit to the orphanage. The lesson started off with a recap of the previous days teachings, which consisted of verbs, and then moved on to focus on different grammatical terms. This lesson had particular focus on nouns and identifying the nouns within in a sentence. Different sentences were written in English on the blackboard and the children were asked to come up to the front and underline the noun in each sentence, all correctly identifying the noun. From starting with simple English words to teaching various grammatical terms, their knowledge and understanding of English is coming along swimmingly as Michiel moves on to teaching more advanced topics aiming to introduce Human Rights perhaps to some of the older children.

IMG_2591With everything learned and the lesson over, it was time for some games! Football seems to be a loved sport in Tanzania, and the orphanage was no different…

Two footballs were given to the children and, joined my Michiel, they rushed out the door to have a kick about outside.The orphanage has a big open space where the children can play and run about between and after lessons. Everyone got involved in the game and the children looked extremely happy and full of energy; it was a great chance for them to get out and be active after learning. We ended up staying for around an hour and a half after the lesson playing and talking to the children which was a great way to get to know more about them outside of the classroom!

Taking the opportunity to volunteer by teaching English is a fantastic opportunity and what better way than to volunteer with Art in Tanzania and support local organisations such as the Glory of Africa Orphanage. With their desire to learn, teaching and getting to know these children seems so rewarding; being able to play games with them is a bonus too!

If you would like to take part in a project like this or for other volunteering opportunities, visit our website for more details!

 

The African Child Day!

Hi!

I am Hikaru. I am an internship student at Dar es Salaam.

On June 16th, the day of African Child, Art in Tanzania participated to Siku Ya Mtoto 2017 as volunteers! We cerebrated this day to encourage improvement of education and environment of children, and re-recognize the challenges to accomplish.IMG_3694

There were so many fun out/indoor games and entertainments for/from children. Other than the time scheduled activities, special side-activities were also settled, such as face painting, free eye checkup and diagnosis for children, and exhibitions of national/ international firms.

Many of school students came as a school field trip! I was fun to in contract with the energetic kids. The event is settled for all kids, boys and girls, with disabilities, who love sports, prefer dancing or arts, have senses of language, and so on. All of recreations let kids to exercise, enjoy and discover their talents.

Although joining kids’ events is not the first time for me, participating in a host side is the first time! Before, while, and after kids are enjoying the event, the staff are running around to make sure the main guests having good time. From this volunteer experience, I could see the needed skills, technology, and atmospheres to organize events and bring those to success.

In my opinion, this volunteer activity was great opportunity especially for education, human rights, marketing, and management intern/ volunteer program.

Art in Tanzania always have other opportunities to lean for people who are interested in different sectors as well!

For more details, visit our Home Page!

Donations to An-Nabawiya Nursery School

school2 SebastienBeunA small nursery in the village of Fuoni, pronounced An – na – Ba – wee –yah, built in 2012 by Ms Asia Issa Jecha and Mr Hassan Mwinyi kombo as part of a women’s project.

The school is run by 6 local teachers who devote their time from 07:30 in the morning to 12:00pm, five days a week, in order to help educate the young local children. The school initially had 93 students and now have at least 100 local children who attend the nursery for free. The nursery building is also used from 19:00 to 20:00 for private tuition classes; these are held by different teachers.

teaching3-SebastienBeunThe children learn English, Maths, Science, Swahili, Arabic, Art and Religious Studies. Art in Tanzania have been involved with the nursery since 2014 and have provided a total number of 10 volunteers who have helped teach the children and also assisted the local teachers, by, for example, providing them with one to one English lessons.

The first day we visited the nursery was to deliver four benches that were kindly donated by a former Swedish volunteer; altogether there are four classrooms, however, all four of the benches were placed in one classroom. The aim is to fill all four classrooms with these little benches so that all of the children can benefit and enjoy learning in a comfortable environment. All the children wanted to sit on them and were extremely excited and happy with the generous donation.

When we went to visit the nursery again, we spoke to the head teacher, Mrs Latifa Mahfoudh, a stunning and pleasant woman who you could see loved working with the children and had always had a passion for teaching; we sat down and had a long chat at about the nursery and what her ambitions were for the nursery and its students.

Latifa pointed out some of the improvements to the actual building that needed to be carried out; a new roof was needed as the current one leaked, new windows were needed as well as a more stable and safer wall/fence around the parameters of the school with a gate, in order to keep the children safe and protected. Two of the classrooms were not plastered so it was impossible to provide a more pleasant environment for the children to learn in, as you can see from the pictures, the classrooms were dark and unpleasant, even with the sun blazing outside. The nursery also needed to build new toilets for the little boys and girls to use.

As well as the children’s facilities, Latifa showed us her own office, which really does need some attention, it would help her to have a proper carpet that covered all of the floor, new stable chairs and shelves so that when volunteers or guests come, they too can use the office and have a pleasant and clean workspace to work in, without feeling your chair is going to giveaway any second! Latifa would also like to go on computer courses and get computer for her office to make her work easier.

Upon our return, three volunteers, Louise Proctor, Claire Manning and Elizabeth Drey flew out to Zanzibar from Ireland and brought with them a very generous donation of over £4000 for the nursery; with their help and local workers, building work has now commenced, with a new roof and plastering. The work on the wall/fence will be started next, and then the new windows will be fitted. The donations will also help to build new toilets for the little boys and girls. A further £3296 has been donated by Whitney Harris-Linton from Michigan (£77 put towards the roof), Melissa Wolsley from Findlay, Australia (donated £99 for a black board to be fitted in the classroom) £2600 and £520 have also been donated from more kind donators. The money given will be used to finish renovating the school and any money left over will be used on a new project in Madale, Dar-Es-Salam, subject to the donors consent.

kiswahili sebastienIf you would like to volunteer at the nursery or donate; your time, skills, money, toys, stationary or school equipment, do contact Edward Busungu at Art in Tanzania and get involved, it certainly is a fantastic project and the children and staff are simply delightful to be around.

If you do wish to teach at the school, we would recommend spending more than two weeks, as this will enable you to build a much better rapport with the children and staff, allowing them to put into practice what you teach and you will be able to witness the difference that your presence can make in their lives and futures.

 

Volunteering for the ’International Day of the African Child’ event

 

At Thursday the 16thJune a bus full of volunteers headed out at five o’clock in the morning to do some volunteering work for the International Day of the African Child at ’The Jakaya M. Kikwete Youth Park’. This is one of the biggest youth parks in Dar Es Salaam opened in October 2015 by the president of the United Republic of Tanzania. Which is compared to other sport venues quite developed as they had artificial football fields for example which is not that common for Tanzanian standards.

The event was apparently created for children which means a lot of colours, laughter and fun. But these colorful balloons weren’t blowing up them self from alone. Decorating was one of our tasks at the event next to judging and conducting of the reading and drawing challenges, taking pictures and collecting video footage, face painting, acting as a mascot or participating at one of the numerous sport challenges like football games or basketball matches. Supporting all these activities, helping to arrange the challenges and cleaning up is concluding our day at the event quite well.

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But next to the hard work (for some it was a tough day especially for our athletes and our mascot volunteers) there was a lot of joy for everyone as the kids who were participating organized several performances from traditional Tanzanian dances to singing performances. Also reputable sponsors like unicef or the Tanzanian government by itself were providing us for all these efforts with a lunch break and refreshing drinks. Next to the events it also had several stalls about nutrition elucidation or little healthy checks as well as technology companies presenting their electronic devices.

All in all, this day was quite a diversification as it was a pretty long and exhausting day for everyone who participated comparable to working at an exhibition day.Even more thankful was everyone for the already prepared food of mama Neema in the evening at home.

For more Information, you can have a look at the Wikipedia entry.

If you want to see more pictures of that day visit the Facebook page of Atte Leskinen Photography

 

Day at the Prestige pre- school and nursery

Day starts like it always starts: a cup of instant coffee and few toasts with jam. After breakfast I and Camilla, another intern here at AIT, are waiting our ride at the volunteer house. Camilla tells me that it would take between 25 minutes and 1,5 hours to get to the school depending how many kids we are picking up after us. Car comes to pick us up at 8.00. There are already few kids and one teacher in the car, but we have to pick couple more kids before we can go to school.

The school is only going on for two weeks, so it is not a regular school, more like fun summer school thing for kids whose parents are still working. Prestige school is located in Mbezi area in Northern Dar es Salaam. School has tuition, so kids who go to school here are coming from “privileged” backgrounds. Kids are mostly between four and six years old.
maalit

We arrive at school around 9 o’clock. Some of the children are so young that they go to nursery. Unfortunately I did not have the time to visit the nursery side. Every morning starts with a praying moment. I also introduce myself and kids are asking me different kinds of questions like “Where are you from?”, “How old are you?”.
After that kids move over to the main teaching area. There are quite many adults: four in a class and then there is me and Camilla, which is a lot comparing to Finland where the same size class would have only two adults. First “subject” is learning what nose does, then color and paint different areas from paper they have been given. Camilla tells me that they have gone through all of the different areas before.

 lounasAfter that it is breakfast time (I feel like a hobbit because I’m having second breakfast), me and Camilla are having chapati and tee. Tee is so sweet that I can almost feel the sugar rush in my veins, chapati are good, like they always are, the only thing missing is some hot sauce.

Painting continues after breakfast and the subject is tongue. When this is done, we go outside to play. Camilla takes eight kids with her to play football and the rest of us are throwing a ball to one another. Kids and teachers also play a local game that I don’t know.
After playing outside for roughly 35 minutes we head back inside. There is a rehearsal of some kind of play. Camilla tells me that they have practiced it every day. The day ends with lunch. I and Camilla are having ugali and some veggies. I think there is cabbage and carrots with some sort of red sauce. Anyway the food is good. And soon it is time to head back to the volunteer house in Madale. This time the travel takes only 20 minutes.

leikkimaalaus

 

By: Tia Suomi

The first Montessori kindergarten in a Tanzanian government school

The kindergarten in Korongoni primary school in Moshi has improved a lot during the last year. I interviewed the main kindergarten teacher Clara, in the beginning of August 2014.

Clara is a qualified primary school teacher for children in standard three to seven and for children with special needs. However, due to the shortage of teachers in Korongoni primary school she was asked to take over the teaching in the kindergarten in 2010.

The first years were tough. Clara was the only teacher for two groups of more than 30 children, aged four to six years. She had almost no teaching materials; only a piece of chalk and one book for each subject. The desks were too big for the children and there were a lot of holes in the classroom floor.

Korongoni kindergarten before and after

The kindergarten building before and after

Clara was kept very busy throughout the whole day. She was teaching, preparing and serving porridge and washing the dishes before the next group of children arrived. Unfortunately, there wasn’t much time between the two groups which meant no break for the teacher. The sizes of the classes were too big for one teacher to handle and Clara felt that she had to play too many different roles. In addition to the teacher’s role she was sometimes acting like a police and sometimes like a grandma. Repeatedly she felt overwhelmed during and after work and experienced headaches. At the time she was not looking forward to her work days.

In 2013 Marissa, an Art in Tanzania volunteer came to the kindergarten. Marissa and Clara became good friends and Clara started to tell Marissa her dreams on how to improve the kindergarten. Together they created a plan, and Clara and representatives from Art in Tanzania researched prices for the budget. Back in the UK, Marissa with the help of GAGA-UK, raised funds which made making all of the improvements possible. In July 2013, Korongoni primary was able to open the first Montessori government kindergarten in Tanzania. Now the building has been renovated, proper desks, chairs and teaching materials purchased and another teacher, Mary, has been hired.

Korongoni kindergarten before and after 2

The class room before and after

Clara is now extremely happy and says that her dream came true. Nowadays she likes going to work and is very happy that Mary is there to help. Clara also tells that the teachers from standard 1 are very pleased with the children coming from her kindergarten as they already know the basics of reading, writing and counting. The reputation of the kindergarten has spread and many parents want a place for their kids there. Unfortunately, it is not possible to take everyone as then the group sizes would grow too big. At the moment the morning class has 32 children and the afternoon class 35.

Clara says that this kind of improvement is not too expensive and that others could do it too. Her wish for the future is that more people would understand how important it is to educate children when they are very young. Clara would especially want to continue emphasising the teaching of the basics (reading, writing and counting) after kindergarten, in classes 1 and 2.

Volunteers are wanted and needed for teaching English in both the kindergarten and the primary classes in Korongoni. Clara suggests that the volunteers could use different methods (games and play) in teaching and she is convinced that the kids will benefit from the volunteers’ teaching.

DSCN4943crop

Clara, Marissa and Mary

Text by Hanna-Mari Pulli

“This is our nursery because this is our society” – Neema’s Nursery and Montessory Daycare

Neema’s Nursery and Montessory Daycare at Kiwodea – Saba Saba Moshi – Tanzania started with seven children on 6th of January 2014. Now there are 35 of 3-6 year old children coming to the nursery and daycare. Neema’s Nursery and Montessory Daycare  is located in Moshi. Neema’s Nursery and Montessory Daycare is a private school and the teaching is mainly in English.

Neema Marko, a teacher and the founder of the nursery school, has before been teaching at Khuba Nursery for seven years. It is her longtime dream to help children’s education as someone helped her once. Neema comes from a poor family and as a child she was selling mangos and onions to get by. Her uncle’s friend from Germany decided to sponsor her and so finishing school became possible for Neema. Now she wants to return the favor by helping children who come from difficult life situations to study. Now, along the work in Khuba nursery, Neema started a new nursery school in January 2014 with a help of volunteer from Finland. Neema will finish working in Khuba nursery in December 2014 when her contract there finishes. She has started teaching adult English class for people with no English or writing skills before. Also in this volunteers can help.

Volunteer in Nursery School

Ever since Neema has worked with volunteers in her new project and she has many very good experiences of the co-operation and this is also why she wanted to work with Art In Tanzania as well. Volunteers in Neema’s Nursery and Montessory Daycare teach English, drawing and math. They are also playing with the children.

Volunteer in Nursery School

At the moment there is also a local girl working as a volunteer. She hasn’t been able to get to the collage so for her working is a good working experience even when she is not paid the teacher salary. Neema needs someone there to help her with teaching, cooking and being with children. Also for the days when Neema is not going to be there, the school has to run.

Neema wants to invite many people to come and help the children and there are many ways of helping. Teaching is the most important thing but also sponsoring the nursery is important because the school is reliant on donations. The school lacks of many things, and books, pencils and also the food for the children are needed. Neema is renting the building and also the rents of two rooms, desks, mattresses and water come quite high and the help is needed. “Teaching is the most important help for the children. But I want to tell about the problems we have. It is not to ask for money or force people to donate but so that people know.”, Neema highlights.

Neema's Nursery School and Daycare

Helping children with education and starting a nursery school has been Neema’s longtime dream that has come true. Now the challenge is to keep the dream alive and the school running. When asked what are her future hopes and plans Neema tells that she would like to go and get a diploma for teaching. She dreams of moving to a new building and to expand to having also a primary and a secondary school as a boarding school. Of the shorter term dreams she would like to collect enough money to get dala dala -car to pick the children to school every day. Some of the children live far away and it is hard to get them to come to school. Many stay at home because the parents don’t have the money to pay the transportation to the school.

These are big dreams for her but not impossible. “Me and you. When we share the dreams can come true.”, Neema says. Neema says that even with her name, the nursery school is not hers but community’s. Even if something happens to Neema, the nursery school needs to go on. “This is our nursery because this is our society.”

This text was written by two volunteers who have been working in Neema’s Nursery and Montessory Daycare at Kiwodea in May-June 2014.

Morning of English, numbers and games in the Winning Star’s Nursery School

By Hanna-Mari Pulli

Winning Stars Nursery  Kunduchi

Volunteers Amy and Helen teaching numbers

This week we visited the Winning Stars Nursery School in Kunduchi. 17 children, from three to seven years old, attend the school. The teacher Glory has worked in the school for two years and says that the volunteers help her a lot! The volunteers come mainly to teach math, English and drawing. The school is free of charge for everyone.The day starts at 9am. Some of the kids come from the orphanage located next to the school and some get dropped off by their parents. This time the children started with math; they were learning numbers and simple calculations, first together and then individually. The volunteers sat down with the kids and helped them when needed.

Winning Stars Nursery  Kunduchi

After finishing their assignments it was time for a play break! The children were playing outside and a couple of them found their inner photographers and took photos with our cameras very enthusiastically. Football, pushing car tires and climbing were also very popular. Before going back inside and continuing to study, a group photo was taken. The kids were very eager to be in the photo and we also promised to send the photos to Glory.

Winning Stars Nursery  Kunduchi

Winning Star’s Nursery School students with the teacher Glory and volunteers Amy and Helen

Winning Stars Nursery  Kunduchi

After the break the children were taught different forms of transportation with pictures; car, bus, airplane, boat and so on. All of the kids came individually in the front of the class to say all of them out loud, and later drew the shapes and wrote the correct names in their booklets. However, soon the kids were getting tired and hungry. The porridge was late. After some 20 minutes of waiting, it finally arrived and the kids settled back to their seats. Glory scooped everyone an individual cup of hot porridge and the children started to eat carefully. When they were finished with their food, it was already past midday and time for the kids to go home.

Winning Stars Nursery  Kunduchi


A day of teaching and medical checks in Sifa Group Foundation orphanage

By Anni Vase & Hanna-Mari Pulli

Sifa Group Foundation Children Centre

One of the orphanages Art in Tanzania supports in Dar es Salaam is an orphanage in Bunju. The Sifa Group Foundation’s orphanage has 32 children of various ages, from one to 16 years old. Some of the older children have a chance to go to school but the rest of the kids rely on the teaching of the volunteers and a local man Erick. Erick is 22 years old and has worked in the orphanage for one year. He does not get paid but hopes that one day his efforts will be noticed. He would like to study engineering but for that he would need a sponsor to pay the fees. Erick speaks English quite well as he spent two years in South-Africa. Besides Erick there are a few other people to takSifa Group Foundation Children Centree care of the daily tasks in the orphanage.

In the beginning of June, we had a chance to visit one of the morning lessons which was held by Art in Tanzania volunteers Kathleen and Maria. The lessons take place in the mornings, usually starting at nine o’clock.

During tSifa Group Foundation Children Centrehe lessons the kids learn English and math along with different games and drawing. At the beginning of our visit the sleeping area was turned into a playing- and teaching area and the children were seated at the desks. The class started with learning the months of the year in English and Swahili. The teacher called months in English and the class repeated them in Swahili and vice versa, followed by a month song that everyone sang together. After half an hour the older kids wrote the months down on paper while the younger kids practiced numbers. All the pencils and notebooks are shared since there are not enough for everyone. When the older kids came back from school, we had a chance to talk with them. For example, Monica (12) and Glory (13) can speak some English but they prefer to communicate by writing.

Sifa Group Foundation Children Centre

On the same day, the kids also got checked by two Art in Tanzania medical volunteers Andy and Cody. The kids’ heartbeat and breathing were tested and minor injuries such as cuts and scratches treated. Luckily majority of the kids are healthy and there were only two kids Andy and Cody would like to check again after a couple of days.

After the class and health checks it was time to play! The children wanted to show their Sifa Group Foundation Children Centreskills with a skipping rope and we joined them in the jumping. Then we gave the children balloons and candy and they were welcomed with huge smiles and joy. The children kept the sweets as their little treasures and wanted to show them to us before eating them. Before we left, the kids also sang for us a song in Swahili. The song was well rehearsed and almost turned us into tears.

Donations such as notebooks, pencils, toys and clothes are needed in the orphanage and some of the older children are in need of sponsor to pay for their school fees. Art in Tanzania is also always looking for new volunteers to make a difference!

Sifa Group Foundation Children CentreSifa Group Foundation Children Centre