Boxing Day at Bahari Beach with Glory of Africa Orphanage

Swapping winter coats for t-shirts & shorts, wellies for flip-flops, and roast dinners for barbecues it’s safe to say Christmas 2017 has been unlike any other for me and spending Boxing Day at the beach with children from the Glory of Africa Orphanage has definitely been a highlight!

IMG_3511.jpg

The idea of a day trip to the beach stemmed from one of our dutch volunteers, Michel, who during his stay at AIT has been teaching English to the children at the orphanage. With donations from himself, Art in Tanzania and some of the other volunteers this idea was made into a reality. On December 26th at 11:30 am we arrived at the Glory of Africa to find the children packed and ready for a blue sea and white sand filled boxing day. After piling into a mini bus we were on our way to Bahari Beach, the local beach which is around a 25 minute drive from the orphanage. Within seconds of arriving the children had already found a spot to put their things and were running around and playing in the sea.

From the budget that was created for the day trip, we were able to buy lunch and drinks for the children which consisted of freshly made rice, beans, vegetables and bananas! Whether they were playing football on the sand or splashing in the sea I could see smiles for miles as they enjoyed their boxing day in the sun, sand and sea.

Without the donations from everyone involved in organising, this day would have not been possible so i’d like to say Asanta sana to Michiel and Art in Tanzania for playing a big part in this trip going ahead!

IMG_3505

+30 degree heat and sand on my feet is far from the norm of a typical Boxing Day in England but I wouldn’t have it any other way. With Art in Tanzania I have been able to have fantastic new experiences, become accustomed to african culture and live in proper Tanzanian style. Volunteers and interns are always coming up with ideas to help or even simply to treat members of the local community and with Art in Tanzania we can make these ideas a reality! If you’d like to be involved or learn more about Art in Tanzania and our mission please visit our website for details!

Asante sana,

Lily 

Football with the Local Children

As well as their own projects, Art in Tanzania interns and volunteers can participate in different projects and activities throughout their stay. Nette, a student from Finland who is here conducting research for her thesis, is a big fan of football; luckily enough so are the local children! Barely even a 5 minute walk from the Dar es Salaam AIT compound is a big open space that acts a pitch where she was able to have a kick-a-bout with a few of the kids, and soon enough more and more came to join in!

These types of activities are available to all interns and volunteers; whether it be an evening hobby or taking part in one of our Sports Placements. There are many different roles to play when undergoing a Sports Placement and one of the most popular choices among volunteers/interns is the Sports Coaching projects:

Sports Coaching with Art in Tanzania 

Each sports coaching placement is specifically tailored to the individual who is participating in the project. Although football is a much loved sport in Tanzania and the most popular among the sports programs, new games and sport activities are welcomed to be introduced. In the past, we have had volunteers introducing the likes of gymnastics, and capoeira – an Afro-Brazilian martial art that combines elements of dance, acrobatics and music. Sports classes in the communities are introduced as part of the children’s curriculum as well as our new popular approach involving community sport mornings whereby local people are bought together on Saturday mornings for health training. With the native language being Swahili, the in-country staff are always happy to assist as a translator where needed; brushing up on a few phrases can never hurt!

IMG_3181

Although the ages of the children that get involved can vary; the high level of enthusiasm  in every child is the same! They really get involved and seem to love every minute of the activities. To read more about what we do within sport in local communities and our different projects don’t hesitate to visit our website!

Asante sana,

Lily

Visit to the National Museum of Dar-es-Salaam

As projects take place Monday-Friday, interns and volunteers have the weekends for trips and other activities; such as visiting the National Museum of Dar es Salaam!

Last Saturday, myself and two other interns took a trip to Dar city centre. Starting in Tegeta, the journey lasted about two hours due to connecting buses in Mbusho and typical weekend traffic! Once there, before heading to the Museum, we stopped at the local fish market located near the ferry port for some lunch where we were able to have some  delicious fresh fish. En route to the museum we passed some notable buildings such as the offices belonging to parliamentary members and the official office of the Prime Minister, Kassim Majaliwa.

IMG_1821.jpg

Working with Art in Tanzania, the Dar es Salaam National Museum has partnered with our organisation in which creating the program: Arts and Music Against Corruption in Africa. This program sees how we can use the arts; such as music and dance, to promote anti-corruption in an interesting and creative way.

Opened to the public on the 7th December 1940, the National Museum is located along Shaban Robert Street at the junction of Sokoine Drive near the Botanical Gardens. It is one of the 5 museums in the country that form the National Museum of Tanzania. Known as the King George V Memorial on its first opening as a dedication to the head of state at the time, the museum began its expansion when Taganyika gained its independence between 1962 and 1964. With the expansion leading to five branches being made, the King George V Memorial transformed into the National Museum displaying a range of exhibits from historical and contemporary art to ethnographic collections on Tanzanian cultures.

One of the most famous exhibits in the museum is named ‘The Cradle of Human Kind’ which displays fossils found in the Olduvai Gorge, a 50km long canyon in northern
Tanzania and one of the most important paleoanthropological sites. One of the most famous artefacts in the museum is located in this exhibit. In 1959 British Archaeologist, Mary Leakey, discovered the of skull of the Paranthropus boisei, an (extinct) hominid. Some of the fossils in ‘The Cradle of Human Kind’ exhibition date back 2 million years and have formed the basis of our understanding of the human evolution!

Being able to travel to the city and other places around Dar-es-Salaam is the best way to explore the culture of Tanzania, and the National Museum taught us a lot about the countries history and its people. If you would like to learn more about the National Museum of Dar-es-Salaam or any of the other 5 museums that are part of the National Museum of Tanzania then head over to their Facebook page, give it a like and have a browse!

Music Dance group “Sanaa Sana”

Hi!

It’s Hikaru. I am one of internship students at the Dar es Salaam compound!

 

This time I would like to introduce one of the music groups that works with Art in Tanzania, Sanaa Sana. They mainly perform overseas, but their main base is Dar es Salaam.

The video from their studio are posted on YouTube!

Sanaa Sana from FB

The Sanaa Sana style is “Traditional, yet Original”. Their dances and music are a combination of styles from Tanzanian tribes or other African nations. They actively incorporate new ideas into their art. For example, the band uses Tanzanian traditional instruments and modern electric guitars. Dancers perform acrobatic choreographs which are not traditional Tanzanian; they implement styles to respond to the demands and the world audiences.

 

Art in Tanzania have various types of projects for intern/ volunteer students; working with Sanaa Sana is one of great examples., It is a great opportunity for students to study about African music. However, this opportunity is not just for them.

“Be original, be unique from others” is an important part of artists. Sanaa Sana’s style does not stay inside of “traditional” or “African”. Many of different characteristic of music can take a role in their performance. Additionally, skills of media are also needed to promote their activities. Volunteering and interning here offers and excellent chance to practice your skills, share your knowledge, and discover your new possibilities.

IMG_3885

IMG_3891

 

There are several objectives that Sanaa Sana tries to leach trough their art. Supporting young people to get involved in “art” and promoting “human rights” are two of their main goals. In Tanzania, school does not put effort into artistic education. Only “drawing” is recognized as a needed class, says a local staff member of the Dar es Salam office. Tanzanian kids do not have chances to develop their other artistic passions, such as singing, playing, dancing, painting, and so on. Members of Sanaa Sana claim that “Now days, there is a music major in universities, BUT the quality of lesson is very poor and there isn’t much that talented students can learn from it.” They believe that their success helping Tanzania to recognize the importance and power of art.

 

“Human rights” is the other big topic of Sanaa Sana’s message. Tanzania still needs to spread the general concept of human rights more widely. The rights of women, children, and disabled people are much further behind. In addition, Tanzania is struggling with corruption at all levels. The corrupt government and society is a huge wall for Tanzanian citizens to learn their and other’s rights. Sanaa Sana often handles these concepts to let other countries know the current situation in Tanzanian and to collect grants.

 

Experiences with Art in Tanzania can let you learn more about your study field and your knowledge will affect local people’s education. Please check our website for more details on intern programs including music/ art but also human right, sports, media, business, and others.

Check out website for more details!

Zanzibar Film Festival – Safari ya Gwalu

GWALU.jpg

Image from google images

Every year Zanzibar holds an international film festival for one week, usually in July, showcasing talented local and international film directors work as well as music and art exhibitions in various locations around Zanzibar from the Old Fort to the Double Tree by Hilton, which is where we sat in a room to watch the two hour film, Safari ya Gwalu, written and directed by Daniel Magane, this was a film inspired by the Kenyan film called First Grader.

The film highlighted the struggles of, not only adult education, but also daily life in Tanzania for both the adults and children. It certainly captured the hearts of its small audience at the Double Tree, with spectators giving a round of applause and praise to the director and the main actor who played Gwalu, Salim Ahmad, who provided a question and answer session at the end.

The Director, Daniel, said that many people have said to him that, if they were able to go to school it would open up new opportunities for them and enable them to live a better life, this was the main inspiration for him to create this film and to emphasise that, even if you are older than the average child that attends school, it is never too late to seek an education and work towards living a better life.

Salim said the main reason he took up the role was the message of education and just how important it is to go to school, no matter what age you are. The message was that if someone really wants to go to school, they should just go to school, no matter what anyone else says.

This film was great at showing what life can be like living in Tanzania, if not in other parts of Africa too, it showed how important it is for the young to go to and stay in school and for those who never went or never finished school before, to go at whatever age they can and if they don’t think they have the courage to go, as Gwalu in the film says, bravery can make a man do things he never thought possible.

The Real Kids

By Anna Kevin and Emilia Sten Photos by Edward Sixtus Busungu (Originally published on May 18, 2014)

The co-operation between Real Kids FC trojafootballand Art in Tanzania started already in 2001, and now it was time for them to get new clothes. Real Kids FC is a football club on Zanzibar. The club consists of two teams Junior league and Central. Junior league is from 8-13 year olds and Central for 16-20 year olds. At the moment the younger team has 37 players and the older 25. The players are really committed, they practice every weekday and have games almost every weekend. Since 2011 the Central team is playing in the ZFA Central league, which is the “national league” of Zanzibar. The road hasn’t been easy for the Real Kids FC. They didn’t have much in the beginning, but since the coach Salum Ahmed Mahadh knocked on Edward’s door they now have much more resources.

First game with the new shirts, against Rolling Stones. Unfortunately they lost 1-2. It was only a friendly game, the real league starts 15th of October.

First game with the new shirts, against Rolling Stones.

Edward Sixtus Busungu is the manager of Art in Tanzania on Zanzibar and he puts his whole heart into helping the team. He has spread the word of the team in the aim of getting as much support as possible. Donated footballs have arrived even from England. Last Saturday the team got brand new football clothes from Art in Tanzania. The design and the making of the clothes were made by Detroit Sober House – one of Art in Tanzania’s community development projects. The team now looks like a professional team and maybe that takes them one step closer to their dream – to be part of the national team of Tanzania.

Volunteers and staff from Art In Tanzania show off their football skills

By David Kiarie (Originally Published on Sep 26, 2013)

Volunteers and staff from Art In Tanzania will this evening flex their muscles when they meet for a football match at Kondo grounds of Bahari beach.

In the last encounters, the volunteers overpowered their hosts winning two of the three matches they have played.

In the first match the volunteers crashed the 222633_10151235851051930_601836986_n-300x200staff two goals to nail. The match that followed saw the staff spirit dampen further after they lost to the volunteers 2-1. The staff team however managed to beat the volunteers’ 2-3 in their third match.

This evening, the two teams will be meeting for the fourth time this year and the game is expected to be action packed with each team yearning to win.

Besides bringing the volunteers and the staff together, the games offer an opportunity for the volunteers most of who come from other countries an opportunity to interact with locals who turn up in sizeable numbers to spectate.

How copyright issues have hit music industry hard in Tanzania

By Katie O’Reilly-Boyles (Originally published on Sep 16, 2013)
Stalls with counterfeit products are as common in Zanzibar as in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Stalls with counterfeit products are as common in Zanzibar as in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Lack of copyright law enforcement is ruining artists in Tanzania. Some brand names like Kilimanjaro, for example, are common and likely to be used uncontrollably by many companies in Tanzania, especially due to its association with the tallest free standing mountain in Africa.The name is prevalent and commonly used for a range of different products and services whose businesses are not connected in any way with the famous mountain– this is due to the diluted copyright laws in Tanzania. But consumer goods companies and services are not affected in the same way as artists, who are struggling even more with this problem.

Although there is some legislation which aims to protect artists and producers from copyright theft, the counterfeit market still flourishes and the creative industry continues to be affected. We interviewed Katasinga Ngoi, a local guitarist and singer, about his views on the issue.

Follow the link below to watch the interview

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151581819526930&set=vb.142930706929&type=2&theater

Wonder Workshop, where art meets innovation

By Laura Alioravainen and Marjut Valtanen

Team Leaders, Art in Tanzania (Originally published on Sep 9, 2013)

Artists work on a wood at Wonder Workshop of Oysterbay in Dar es Salaam

An artist works on a wood at Wonder Workshop of Oysterbay in Dar es Salaam

When you pass between tens of little stores and boutiques selling imported shoes and clothes from Asia and all the pirated DVDs salesmen,  you can find a true gem in the streets of Dar Es Salaam. Behind the red gates exists Wonder Workshop. This craft shop was founded in 2005 by Paul Joynson-Hicks and its business model is pure genius.

Starting with three employees Wonder Workshop was making art out of scrap metal. Presently the organization employs 42 Tanzanian nationals with different disabilities. The brilliancy of Wonder workshop lies in the ability to see resources and potential where others so often overlook. Here used products and trash, typically scrap metal, wood, glass and plastic, from the streets get a new life in beautiful forms of greeting cards, jewellery, art, toys and in so many ways that our imagination can’t reach. The employees of Wonder Workshop say their inspiration comes from the nature and beauty of Africa and its wildlife.

Paper making at Wonder workshop

Paper making at Wonder workshop

Every year there is about hundred new applicants to work in Wonder workshop and get off the streets. A valuable asset to the workshop’s development and expansion is collaboration with volunteers and interns from all over the world. Volunteers can use their education and knowhow to help develop new products. Volunteering here is also a great opportunity to work with recycled material, truly test innovativeness with limited resources and learn the unique wonders of this workshop.

For more information, visit the workshop’s website: www.wonderworkshop.co.tz/

Up-and-coming artist on Bahari Beach tells us his story

By Katie O’Reilly-Boyles (Originally published on Aug 26, 2013)

Creating traditional African art on Bahari Beach may sound like the dream job, but 29 year old Musti has been working hard at his artist’s studio, Zamani Sanaa, Swahili for ‘Old Art’ for over a year and a half. Painted using water colours and oil paints on canvas, the Tingatinga style which he uses is very popular with art lovers, so Musti’s workshop is gradually growing as a successful business as he makes contacts, and his studio/gallery becomes more well-known in the area.DSC08458-300x168

Although he has been interested in pursuing his talent for painting for the last six years, Musti wasn’t always going to become a professional painter. His creative ability was evidently always present, however, because he was an artist in a different respect, working as a lyricist and singer as a teenager! As well as his pastimes including sports activities and travelling, art was also a hobby alongside this, but his passion for painting truly blossomed and developed in his twenties.

Although creative arts seem to run in the family, with his brother being an artist and filmmaker as well as a boxer, Musti tells us that his inspiration was himself, as he made the important decision to change from music to art, feeling that this could be a more successful life plan. Quickly and successfully learning how to use strong and vibrant colours to produce Tingatinga at Bagamoyo, where his friend was studying sculpture, his art career was soon launched. Unlike many shops which may have security apparatus or perhaps a security guard to prevent the merchandise from being snatched, Musti insists that he does not need to worry about people stealing art which is in the style of Tingatinga because of its traditional nature, and the fact that even potential thieves would therefore not disrespect it to that extent.DSC08461-300x168

Although Musti runs the business himself, he does have some helping hands around the studio from some boys, who he mentors and wants to teach working skills in order to help them survive in the future. Similarly, Musti, although retaining his individual talents for producing the Tingatinga art, is keen to pass on his expertise, and the joy of expressing through art, to people who want to come to the workshop, hire some canvas and learn how to produce traditional African art.

Admitting that Art in Tanzania has been very helpful and supportive for his career, he also wants his art business to be internationalized – we hope to see more of Musti’s work in the future!